Liaoning Aircraft Carrier

Liaoning Aircraft Carrier | Liaoning Class

Liaoning Aircraft Carrier

Liaoning Aircraft Carrier (Liaoning 16) is the first aircraft carrier commissioned into the People’s Liberation Army Navy Surface Force. It is classified as a training ship, intended to allow the Navy to practice with carrier usage.

Originally laid down as the Admiral Kuznetsov class multirole aircraft carrier Riga for the Soviet Navy, she was launched on December 4, 1988, and renamed Varyag in 1990.[5] The stripped hulk was purchased in 1998 by the People’s Republic of China and towed to Dalian shipyard in northeast China. After being completely rebuilt and undergoing sea trials, the ship was commissioned into the People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) as Liaoning (Liaoning Aircraft Carrier) with the class name Type 001 on September 25, 2012. In November 2016, the political commissar of Liaoning, Senior Captain Li Dongyou, stated that Liaoning was combat ready.

General and specialized information

Name Namesake Ordered Awarded Builder
Liaoning 16 Liaoning Province N/A N/A Mykolaiv South | Nevskoye Planning and Design Bureau

Dalian Shipbuilding Industry

Cost Laid down Sponsored by Christened Launched
N/A December 4, 1988 (as the Varyag) N/A N/A December 4, 1988
Commissioned Homeport Motto Knickname Current Status
September 25, 2012 Qingdao – Liaoning Province N/A N/A Active – January 2017

General characteristics

Liaoning Aircraft Carrier

Class and type: Kuznetsov-class aircraft carrier
Displacement:
  • 43,000-tonnes, light[1][2]
  • 53,000 – 55,200-tonnes, standard[1][2][3]
  • 58,600 – 67,500-tonnes, max[1][2]
Length:
  • 304.5 m (999 ft) o/a
  • 270 m (890 ft) w/l
Beam:
  • 75 m (246 ft) o/a
  • 35 m (115 ft) w/l
Draft: 8.97 m (29.4 ft)
Installed power: Steam
Propulsion:
  • Steam turbines, 8 boilers, 4 shafts, 200,000 hp (150 MW)
  • 4 × 50,000 hp (37 MW) turbines
  • 9 × 2,011 hp (1,500 kW) turbogenerators
  • 6 × 2,011 hp (1,500 kW) diesel generators
  • 4 × fixed pitch propellers
Speed: 32 knots (59 km/h; 37 mph)
Range: 3,850 nautical miles (7,130 km; 4,430 mi) at 32 knots
Endurance: 45 days
Complement:
  • 1,960 crew
  • 626 air group
  • 40 flag staff
  • 3,857 rooms

Systems and Armament

Class and type: Type 001 (ref: Kuznetsov-class aircraft carrier)
Armament:
  • 3 × Type 1130 CIWS
  • 3 × HQ-10 (18 Cell Missile system)[4]
Aircraft carried:
  • 24 Shenyang J-15
  • 6 Changhe Z-18
  • 4 Changhe Z-18J
  • 2 Harbin Z-9
  • Total of 36 fixed wing and rotary wing aircraft

Liaoning – Origin

The ship was laid down as Riga at Shipyard 444 (now Mykolaiv South) in Mykolaiv, Ukraine, on December 6, 1985.[10][11] Design work was undertaken by the Nevskoye Planning and Design Bureau.[12] Launched on December 4, 1988, the carrier was renamed Varyag in late 1990, after the famous cruiser.

Construction ceased by 1992, with the ship structurally complete but without electronics. With the dissolution of the Soviet Union, ownership was transferred to Ukraine; the ship was laid up, unmaintained. Ukraine immediately began searching for possible customers, and made overtures to China, which sent a high-level expert delegation in 1992. Although the delegation made a positive report on the condition of the ship, recommending a purchase, the Beijing leadership declined because of the international diplomatic situation at the time. Nevertheless, the People’s Liberation Army Navy did not lose interest, and four years later took an independent initiative for a commercial purchase.[13]

In April 1998, Ukrainian Trade Minister Roman Shpek announced the winning bid of US$20 million from Chong Lot Travel Agency, a Hong Kong-based company, which proposed to tow Varyag out of the Black Sea, through the Suez Canal and around southern Asia to Macau, where the ship would be moored and converted into a floating hotel and casino, similar to the Kiev in Tianjin and Minsk at Minsk World in Shenzhen.[11] Before the auction was closed, officials in Macau had warned Chong Lot that it would not be permitted to berth Varyag in the harbor. Chong Lot is owned by Chin Luck Holdings Company of Hong Kong. The sale of the carrier was successfully closed in 1998.[14]

In January 2015, further details of the transaction emerged from an interview with Xu Zengping by the South China Morning Post.[13] Xu reported that he was commissioned by the PLAN to purchase the vessel on its behalf, with the floating hotel and casino as a cover story to avoid offending the U.S. and to placate Ukrainian concerns about potential military use. He was warned that there was significant risk from the lack of both a navy budget and support of Beijing for the purchase. Nevertheless, in 1998 Xu was so impressed when he boarded the ship in Mykolaiv, that he resolved to purchase it using his personal funds despite the risks. The previous year, Xu had already spent HK$6 million creating a Macau shell company, Agencia Turistica e Diversoes Chong Lot, having borrowed HK$230 million from a Hong Kong business friend. He described a harrowing negotiation in Kiev, lubricated by bribery and liquor, which helped to arrange victory at the auction. As a precaution, the next day he shipped the 40 tonnes of blueprints for the carrier overland to China in eight trucks. There also was a charge of US$10 million for late payment due to difficulties raising the funds during the Asian financial crisis.

Liaoning – Classification:

Often referred to as an aircraft carrier, the vessel was officially classified by her Soviet builders as “тяжёлый авианесущий крейсерtyazholiy avianesushchiy kreyser (TAKR or TAVKR) “heavy aircraft-carrying cruiser.” The Soviet Union argued that the ships were not aircraft carriers under the Montreux Convention and not subject to the 15,000 ton limit imposed on aircraft carriers traveling through the Bosphorus.[6][7] No signatory to the Montreux Convention objected to their designation as aircraft cruisers, and Turkey allowed the Kuznetsov class to transit the Straits.[8]

The Chinese Navy considers the ship to be an aircraft carrier [9] and unlike the Russian aircraft carrier Admiral Kuznetsov, which carries surface-attack cruise missiles usually found on cruisers, Liaoning is equipped only with air defense weapons and must use its aircraft for surface attack.

Aircraft handling

On 4 November 2012, the People’s Liberation Army’s website (Chinese: 中国军网) reported that Shenyang J-15s had performed carrier touch-and-go training.[55][56] On 25 November 2012, China announced that J-15s had made five successful arrested landings on Liaoning.[57][58][59][60] In June 2013, a second round of flight tests began on board Liaoning, with personnel from the fleet air arm of the Brazilian Navy providing carrier training support to the PLAN.[61][62]

In August 2014, based on an article from Chinese state media, western news outlets reported that two pilots had been killed testing jets slated to operate from Liaoning.[63][64] Chinese military officials stated such reports were misleading, and clarified that deaths were in fact unrelated with tests on the carrier.[65][66] The original Chinese article from Xinhua also did not link the deaths with the J-15 nor mention any loss of such aircraft.[67]

In August 2014, the Chinese-language Shanghai Morning Post listed that Liaoning would carry 36 aircraft: 24 Shenyang J-15 fighters, six Changhe Z-18F anti-submarine warfare (ASW) helicopters, four Changhe Z-18J airborne early warning helicopters and two Harbin Z-9C rescue helicopters. The Chinese carrier aircraft inventory is similar to a balanced combat and support aircraft approach intended for Soviet aircraft carriers, which supported nuclear submarines, large surface combatants, and land-based strike bombers performing anti-access roles. The air wing lacks long-range radar and anti-submarine fixed-wing aircraft, needing support from shore-based aircraft such as Tupolev Tu-154 ASW and Shaanxi Y-8 AWACS aircraft. The U.S. Department of Defense noted that J-15s will have below normal range and armament when operating from the carrier, due to limits imposed by the ski-jump takeoff system.[68] The lack of a carrier onboard delivery aircraft like the United States Navy (USN) Grumman C-2 Greyhound also limits logistics capabilities. Liaoning would need extensive land-based support to oppose a USN carrier strike group; however, it would be potent against the Vietnam People’s Navy and the Philippine Navy. Deficiencies will likely be corrected with future aircraft carriers, which are expected to be larger with conventional takeoff decks and catapult launching for heavier fighters, plus fixed-wing radar and anti-submarine patrol aircraft.

History

Transfer to China

The passage from Ukraine to China was even more problematic than the purchase. In mid-2000, the Dutch International Transport Contractors tugboat Suhaili with a Filipino crew was hired to take Varyag under tow. Chong Lot could not get permission from Turkey to transit the dangerous Bosphorus strait; under the Montreux Treaty of 1936 Turkey is obligated to permit free passage, but has certain sovereignty and refusal rights. The hulk spent 16 months under tow circling in the Black Sea while high-level PRC officials negotiated on Chong Lot’s behalf, offering Chinese tourism as an incentive to permit the ship’s passage.[15][16] In late 2001, Turkey relented from its position that the vessel posed too great a danger to maritime traffic of the Bosphorus, allowing the transit.[17] On November 2, Varyag, escorted by 27 other vessels, completed its six-hour passage through the Dardanelles without incident, making for Çanakkale at 5.8 knots (10.7 km/h; 6.7 mph).[18]

Varyag under tow in the Bosphorus through İstanbul

On November 4, Varyag was caught in a force 10 gale and broke adrift while passing the Greek island of Skyros. Sea rescue workers tried to re-secure the hulk as it drifted toward the island of Euboea.[19][20] A seven-member crew remained on board as six tugboats tried to re-establish their tow. After many failed attempts to reattach the lines, a Greek coast guard helicopter landed on Varyag and picked up the seven crew members.[21] One tug managed to make a line fast to the ship that day, but high winds severely hampered efforts to secure the ship. On November 6, a sailor from the tug Haliva Champion, died after a fall while attempting to reattach the tow lines; the hulk was taken back under tow on the same day.[22][23]

The Suez Canal does not permit passage of “dead” ships – those without an on-board power source – so the hulk was towed through the Strait of Gibraltar, around the Cape of Good Hope, and through the Straits of Malacca at an average speed of 6 knots (11 km/h) across the 15,200-nautical-mile (28,200 km) journey, calling for supplies at Piraeus, Greece; Las Palmas, Canary Islands; Maputo, Mozambique; and Singapore en route. It entered Chinese waters on February 20, 2002, and arrived March 3 at Dalian Shipyard in northeast China. The costs included $25 million to the Ukrainian government for the hull, nearly $500,000 in transit fees and $5 million for the towing.[citation needed] While public statements claimed Varyag was to become a casino, in February 2002 Chong Lot was not awarded casino licenses by Macau.

Xu Zengping, the impresario for the whole process from 1996 to 1999, estimated in 2015 the total cost out of his own pocket to be at least US$120 million. He insisted that he has received no reimbursement at all from China, and has spent the last 18 years repaying his debts, in part by selling properties including his palatial home. A source familiar with the acquisition offered the explanation that many of the naval officials initiating the mission had either died or were in jail.[24]

Contrary to information that had been disseminated by Beijing, Xu reported that all four original engines of the propulsion system remained in place preserved in grease seals at the time of purchase and removal to China.[25] A refit restored them to working order in 2011.

Modernization and refit

In 2008, Robert Karniol, the Asia editor of Jane’s Defence Weekly, said: “The Chinese haven’t seen this type of carrier before and it could be very useful to them. They are trying to vacuum up as much know-how as they can”.[26] Liu Huaqing, a senior admiral of the PLAN and proponent of naval modernization, has spoken of the 21st century as the “century of the sea” and called for naval modernization over several decades.[27]

Ex-Varyag undergoing refit at Dalian in 2011

Varyag was moved in June 2005 to a dry dock at Dalian (38.935°N 121.6141°E). Her hull was sandblasted, scaffolding erected, and the ship’s island was painted in a red marine primer to treat metal corrosion. On October 24, 2006, the Russian newspaper Kommersant reported that Russia planned to sell up to 50 Sukhoi Su-33 fighters to China through Rosoboronexport, in a $2.5 billion deal. In March 2009 Moskovskij Komsomolets reported that negotiations had collapsed over Russian fears that China might undercut Russian exports by producing cheaper versions of the Su-33 equipped with Chinese systems, similar to the development of the Shenyang J-11 from the Sukhoi Su-27.[28]

In 2007, Jane’s Fighting Ships stated that the ship would possibly be named Shi Lang and assigned pennant number 83, but that these were unconfirmed.[29]Jane’s Navy International noted in October 2007 that “refurbishment work and fitting out is continuing and the vessel is expected to begin initial sea trials in 2008”.[30] At the end of 2008, the Asahi Shimbun reported that the carrier was “nearing completion”.[31] On April 27, 2009, the carrier was reported to have been moved into another dry dock, “to install engines and other heavy equipment”.[32] Sensors that have been observed are Type 348 active electronically scanned array (AESA) Radar (four arrays) and Sea Eagle radar. Weapons observed have been the Type 1030 CIWS, and the FL-3000N missile system. It has also been observed that the old anti-ship missile tubes would not be used, freeing up internal space for hangar or storage use. Russia has similar plans to modernize her sister ship Admiral Kuznetsov.[33]

In 2009, the PLAN constructed a full scale logistics, training deck and island mock-up at the Wuhan Naval Research facilities near Huangjia Lake, Wuhan.[34][35] On June 8, 2011, the Chief of the General Staff of the People’s Liberation Army, Gen. Chen Bingde made the first acknowledgement of the ship’s existence from China’s armed forces, stating that the carrier “is being built, but has not been completed.” The ship would be used for training and as a model for a future indigenously-built ship. Qi Jianguo, assistant to the chief of the PLA’s general staff said “All of the great nations in the world own aircraft carriers — they are symbols of a great power.”[36] On July 27, 2011, the Chinese Defense Ministry announced it was refitting the vessel for “scientific research, experiment and training”.[37]

Sea trials and handover

On 10 August 2011, the ex-Varyag began sea trials. An RSIS analyst noted that China still had a long way to go to make her operational, but was determined to do so.[38] On 15 August 2011, she docked in Dalian, completing her first four-day sea trial.[39]On 29 November 2011 the carrier left port for her second set of trials.[40][41] In December 2011 the ship was photographed by satellite while undertaking sea trials.[42] The carrier completed her eighth sea trial between 7 June and 21 June 2012 and returned to Dalian. In July 2012, the ship set out for the longest sea trials thus far, 25 days, and there was speculation that this would have involved testing the launching and recovery of aircraft.[43]

The carrier completed sea trials in early August 2012 and loaded Shenyang J-15 aircraft and KJ-88, YJ-83K, and YJ-91 missiles in preparation for weapons systems trials.[44] Reuters analysis suggested the role of the ship would be mostly training and evaluation ahead of the building of domestic carriers, with only a limited operational role. Flight control software, avionics, weapons and radars were yet undeveloped. Reuters reported PLA officers stating the carrier was far from operational with extensive further trials and exercises required.[45]

On 23 September 2012, the aircraft carrier was handed over to the PLAN, and was commissioned on 25 September 2012.[46] At the commissioning ceremony, the carrier was officially named Liaoning, in honour of the province in which she was retrofitted.[27][47] On 26 December 2012, the People’s Daily reported that it would take four to five years for the Liaoning to reach full capacity, mainly due to training and coordination requirements related to this being the first operational aircraft carrier in the PLAN’s possession.[48] As it is currently a training ship, Liaoning is not assigned to any of China’s operational fleets.[49]

On 7 April 2014, U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel became the first foreign visitor to take a tour of the Liaoning during a wider trip to China to discuss cybersecurity and address China’s military buildup in the East China Sea. Secretary Hagel had asked to see the ship in early 2014, and the request was accepted in advance of his arrival. Hagel and a number of his staff toured the vessel at Yuchi Naval Base, observing the medical facilities, living quarters, flight deck, bridge, and flight control station. They received a briefing about the carrier and also had refreshments with junior officers. The U.S. Department of Defense said that Secretary Hagel was pleased to visit the Liaoning and was impressed by the professionalism of the officers and crew.[50]

During sea trials, the Liaoning experienced a steam burst in the engine compartment which forced crew to evacuate some parts of the ship, and the ship lost power. The problem was ultimately resolved and power was restored, although the time duration of the problem has not been released by military officials.[51]

According to geopolitical analysts, China could use Liaoning and its future carriers to intimidate other smaller countries that have territorial claims in the South China Sea, as well as extending air control further south of the disputed region.[52] In December 2016 the ship exercised in the Western Pacific, including passing through the Miyako Strait between the Japanese islands of Miyako-jima and Okinawa.

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  70. Liaoning Aircraft Carrier News | Liaoning Aircraft Carrier Videos | Liaoning Aircraft Carrier History |Liaoning Aircraft Carrier References | Liaoning Aircraft Carrier As seen in the News | Liaoning Aircraft Carrier from China | Liaoning Aircraft Carrier on TV | Liaoning Aircraft Carrier on YouTube

China’s Liaoning aircraft carrier makes deep water debut

Published on Dec 29, 2016

China carried out naval exercises involving its Liaoning aircraft carrier in the West Pacific during the Christmas period. Among the drills were aerial refueling, air-combat confrontation and the successful landing of the new J-15 fighter jet on the aircraft carrier. However, several of China’s neighbors viewed these routine exercises with suspicion. The drills, coupled with previous live-fire exercises, may be seen as China flexing its naval muscles, but they’re all par for the course, and Chinese officials have urged concerned parties not to make a mountain out of a mole hill. Listen in on the discussion with Senior Captain Zhang Junshe; Teng Jianqun from the China Institute of International Studies; and retired US Army General Wesley Clark, who used to be the NATO Supreme Allied Commander in Europe.

An automatic transcription is of this video is made available by YouTube.

0:00
your captain job how should we
0:01
understand the level of exercises that
0:06
allowing the aircraft carrier is now
0:08
doing at this moment
0:10
well I think that it was conducting and
0:13
no more and routine training according
0:15
to the training plant of the Pierrot
0:18
Navy about it was the first time for the
0:21
airport to carries fighter tests to the
0:24
high seas to conduct such kind of
0:26
between the physical differences it is
0:28
not just the aircraft with a spider Jets
0:31
but also something called the initial
0:33
operation capabilities so exactly what
0:36
is allowing trying to achieve this time
0:39
well we we can see that through the
0:42
portal see the East China Sea and South
0:46
China Sea and also the resident pacific
0:48
ocean at the onion aircraft carrier and
0:52
is supporting ever vessels including the
0:56
destroyers and frigates and also the
0:59
fighter tests are artistic how is
1:03
conducting and tactical training
1:07
including the air confrontation training
1:10
and also very airy feeling training said
1:12
this training require height and novel
1:17
techniques and also tactics tactics and
1:21
see the first time follow the air carrot
1:23
to go to the western Pacific region so
1:26
all these shows that the airport area
1:29
has achieved is initial operation
1:32
operational capability ok maybe some of
1:35
the terminology knew you was a senior
1:37
captain job is not that familiar to our
1:40
audience from all over the world but
1:41
certainly could be familiar to General
1:43
Clark and therefore General Clark what
1:45
is your judgment all over exactly what
1:48
the roaming is doing there are people
1:50
over reacting to it they’re overly
1:52
concerned
1:53
well I think that all of us who watch
1:58
the progress of the chinese navy of
2:01
understood that the felony was going to
2:03
become operational that its pilots
2:05
needed training as pilots were going to
2:07
move beyond Chinese coastal waters and
2:11
the ship was going to
2:12
be prepared for deployment so I don’t
2:14
think there’s any military significance
2:17
in this beyond the fact that the Chinese
2:20
Navy is gaining bluewater capabilities i
2:23
think the concern you’re seeing has to
2:25
do with the larger issues concerning
2:27
China’s overall policy its intent in the
2:30
South China Sea of end of a little bit
2:34
from the dust-up and rhetoric between
2:37
president-elect ramen and Chinese
2:40
leadership you’re telling your invasion
2:42
what do you make of General Clark cast
2:45
judgment at this point is Taiwan issue
2:48
the one of the reasons at least learning
2:53
is there i don’t think there is any
2:56
director connection between the training
2:58
and the UC of Taiwan at this moment but
3:01
some you know media entire while some in
3:04
the petitions in taiwan said this is
3:07
actually a very specific training
3:10
targeted and be the separatists be in I
3:14
want but you know from the Chinese
3:16
military side they are already foremost
3:19
suggestion that it is there nothing in
3:22
the waters together with some of the
3:24
other fighter jet at to make sure
3:27
china has the capability of this is a
3:28
you inside the country this is a another
3:31
side of the coin i think this is a
3:33
continuation of our test this is a test
3:36
and experiment platform for the future
3:39
aircraft carrier and i think the most
3:43
important part for these changing it
3:45
that we have a real compete at ask for
3:49
task force including the aircraft
3:52
carrier destroyer freegate and also
3:55
summer even and also the fighters and we
3:58
also saw the refuting you know in the
4:03
air and the wire of the missiles in
4:07
Cheney this is a very important step for
4:10
the task force of the better group of
4:13
crap that that that mean a chinese movie
4:17
that does have the real ok task force of
4:21
across icy senior captain job they’re
4:25
having very to diverse opinions about
4:27
exactly what downing is about there’s
4:30
one stream of opinion suggesting well me
4:34
is just one of those retire from other
4:37
countries and trying to remake it a
4:38
little bit repaired it and put it on the
4:40
water just to demonstrate China’s the
4:42
capability of having an aircraft carrier
4:44
so it’s not much of a deal at all and
4:48
others are suggesting wow this is really
4:50
serious
4:51
china is trying to flex its muscles in
4:54
the South China Sea trying to
4:56
demonstrate to the neighboring countries
4:57
that China can and will do something in
5:00
the near future so these of course
5:03
opinions are very different from one
5:05
another but these are all circling as
5:08
you can see in the media exactly what is
5:12
time having leone why is China trying at
5:15
this critical point when the president
5:18
in the United States coming into the
5:20
office trying to do this drill and what
5:23
is China’s ambition really maybe wise
5:26
you’re coming from the Navy Ray surgeons
5:27
dunno probably could tell us exactly
5:29
what is about what is a big question but
5:32
first I want to say that their part and
5:35
carrier is a good weapon to defend our
5:39
motherland and also i want to see that
5:42
by contacting high seas training and
5:47
also remote training with is a fighter
5:52
tests and also is supporting destroyers
5:54
and fries
5:55
I think this demonstrates these aircraft
5:58
carrier or all of the Chinese Navy has
6:01
achieved is the initial operational
6:04
capabilities that can extend our
6:07
American defense and range but on the
6:10
other side I want to see that it is only
6:13
initial operational capability are not
6:15
full operational capability is a fire we
6:18
are we for the Air
6:20
carrier to achieve full operational
6:22
capability
6:23
ok that your cabin john i want to be
6:25
even more direct with you with this
6:27
question is China’s developing aircraft
6:31
carry including having this grill
6:33
mounting and some of the other fighter
6:34
jets to determine or two in the future
6:39
proactively taking military actions
6:43
against others in the region
6:45
first I want to see this routine
6:47
training of the Iranian Air Park area is
6:50
not flexing max muscle we know that the
6:53
United States neighborhood has 10
6:55
aircraft carriers operating all over the
6:57
world and this one is not want to show
7:04
our strength
7:05
no not want to see that this bottle by
7:07
having as an aircraft carrier or more
7:11
ever carries will certainly improve our
7:14
defense capabilities it’s not fair if I
7:17
keep on to let you explain about things
7:19
which you have explained very clearly at
7:21
this point so you talk about numbers
7:22
let’s talk about number US Department of
7:24
Defense recently outlined keep really
7:26
the gap between Chinese and US Navy’s
7:28
take a look at this China so far has
7:30
only one aircraft carrier though there
7:33
are reports that another one bigger done
7:35
the loaning is under construction we
7:37
cannot confirm it at this point
7:39
well the United States has 10 carriers
7:41
plus 1 year commissioning and another
7:44
one under construction
7:46
General Clark I want to go to you about
7:48
that what is us having in mind of course
7:51
you’re one of the most powerful
7:52
countries in the world and to do that is
7:55
to keep peace in the world certainly
7:57
military is there to deter and yet many
8:00
are wondering whether your military is
8:02
likely to take some and predictable or
8:05
unwelcome the gestures and actions in
8:08
the waters near china as well
8:13
I wouldn’t think so but you know we do
8:15
have a policy of maintaining 10
8:18
operational aircraft carriers in these
8:20
carriers as they age their replaced and
8:23
by other carriers so of what you’re
8:26
seeing is the normal process their
8:28
carriers that will be decommissioned and
8:30
there will be new carriers that we
8:32
brought in most these carriers are
8:34
stationed on the east coast of the
8:35
United States someone the west coast one
8:38
is stationed in Japan they mostly rotate
8:41
in and out of Europe in the
8:43
Mediterranean and the Persian Gulf and
8:46
so at one point we’ve had up to three in
8:49
the Persian Gulf we’re still mostly
8:52
focused on the Middle East and in the
8:54
Mediterranean and the Persian Gulf so
8:56
that’s the way these carriers operate
8:58
then they go out for long periods of
9:00
time and just as allowed yelling is done
9:03
they do change their crews they do
9:06
operational workups and then they deploy
9:10
so that that’s the pattern of this but
9:13
General Clark help me to understand this
9:17
i’m not a military person of course not
9:19
maybe at all but if the US aircraft
9:23
carrier is also in the region doing it’s
9:27
what they call surveillance in the
9:28
international water while the fighter
9:31
jets are also in the international air
9:34
doing what they call drills and the
9:36
routines while the Chinese ones are also
9:40
there is there a chance
9:44
elisa slight chance that there might be
9:47
some accidents like we use the word or i
9:52
would i would not even smaller anyway
9:55
not have General Clark no I don’t think
10:00
there’s much chance of this because um
10:02
these up the United States Navy is
10:05
extremely well trained and disciplined
10:06
and as China builds its bluewater fleet
10:10
it’s also developing the procedures
10:12
begin to effectively coordinate and
10:15
avoid these kinds of incidents at sea we
10:18
had a long understanding with the Soviet
10:21
Navy during the Cold War
10:22
helped us avoid any misunderstandings
10:25
and there have been these continuing
10:26
discussions around the South China Sea
10:29
about moving toward these understandings
10:31
of there’s some progress in that area
10:34
probably not as definitive as it was
10:37
between the United States and the
10:38
Soviets but as China develops its Navy
10:41
it’s going to want those assurances
10:42
citta come back to you
10:46
yeah if General Clark has dismissed the
10:49
opportunity or the chance and these two
10:52
off any accident then what about the
10:55
danger of other concrete or other
10:57
players in the region you mean when do
11:00
you yelling is out there a few days ago
11:03
that were reports in the media
11:05
suggesting from Taiwan authorities some
11:08
members and suggesting Taiwanese likely
11:10
to take quote responsive actions and
11:13
when necessary and a quote what would
11:17
that mean to learning and also this
11:20
routine grill as senior captain john
11:23
just described
11:24
not only that but also japan which China
11:29
does not at this point enjoy very
11:31
friendly shall i say diplomatic
11:33
relations because of history issues
11:34
because of reasons South China Sea East
11:37
China Sea issue so what about the
11:40
possibility there are certain i should
11:43
also ask you about any chance of ganger
11:47
there is some danger for the center you
11:50
know clash between the Chinese Navy and
11:54
the Japanese neighboring in future but I
11:56
think as every interval water Navy it
12:00
does have two communities the first is
12:03
operation in the war and the second is a
12:06
deterrent capability know the the
12:09
Chinese whitepaper defends his last he
12:13
also stated that the Chinese maybe shoot
12:18
in a carry out the coastal defense then
12:22
also the hi-c protection
12:24
so this is actually assignment came by
12:27
the Chinese government or maybe and any
12:30
practice of course because I’m living is
12:34
international service and among the
12:37
three all for services in armed forces
12:41
very international and very professional
12:44
actually and I talk to you know Tamara
12:48
Swift the seven feet commander in camera
12:51
i think last March and about the action
12:56
and reaction in the South China Sea
12:57
between the two navies and he said that
13:00
the two sides were a professional better
13:02
active because in the every side no had
13:07
the only unit 18 and the procedure to
13:11
exchanges their signals and the to
13:13
communicate with each other so this is a
13:15
very specific arrangement for that let
13:19
me just cutting here because we’re not
13:22
now talking about us and trying anymore
13:24
we’re talking about other players as
13:25
well so for example Japan is a United
13:29
States ally in the region being an
13:31
eyeliner description of that is coming
13:33
to rescue when there is danger so will
13:36
that be a proxy possibility of conflict
13:41
I mean when it comes to military we want
13:43
to be a hundred percent sure that there
13:45
would not be any accident because of
13:47
anything but having said that though
13:50
there seemed to be possibilities mr.
13:52
come very briefly coming from you
13:54
yeah there is a possibility for the
13:55
class between the two sighs and even
13:58
between China and Japan and you know
14:02
area and in the in the high seas smart i
14:05
want you to respond to that proxy I
14:09
didn’t I think that Doug is the
14:12
responsibility of all naval powers to
14:15
have their ships their crews there
14:17
airman discipline trained have the right
14:21
procedures to identify of the forces of
14:24
other nations and to take measures so
14:27
there’s no misunderstanding so I we
14:30
don’t see this as a problem of an
14:32
accident if there’s a challenge if
14:35
there’s some political intent
14:37
and yes there can be difficulties but in
14:41
terms of the technical military
14:43
procedures
14:44
there’s no issue okay so many nations
14:47
one together all the time
14:48
ok talking about politics let’s talk
14:50
about politics and we only have a few
14:52
minutes left that’s good thing when we
14:53
talk about politics we do see a lot of
14:56
politics
14:58
General Clark including President
15:00
electron people are coming into the
15:02
office and he’s a rhetoric sorry
15:03
concerning taiwan and some of the other
15:05
issues and meanwhile the Japan’s a
15:09
urgent the willingness we establish some
15:11
kind of what the prime minister of japan
15:13
called Alliance all hope
15:16
obviously it’s about a value system
15:17
excluding other players in the
15:19
asia-pacific region with the United
15:22
States so with this in mind how much are
15:27
we going to see politics threatening the
15:29
security of this region in the coming
15:33
weeks a month
15:35
General Clark I don’t think you I don’t
15:39
think you’re going to see a substantial
15:41
threat to the region through politics
15:42
but I mean Derek are you something mr.
15:45
some person or the optimistic one among
15:48
them are not very optimistic picture i’m
15:50
optimistic
15:51
well why I’ll tell you why I’m
15:53
optimistic go ahead china and the united
15:55
states have deep deep converging
15:58
interests
15:59
we’re both interested in economic
16:00
development of our own people were
16:03
interested in working with others around
16:04
the world we have different systems of
16:07
government we have many common interests
16:09
and um so we’re very happy to work these
16:12
interests together and I think those
16:14
interests extend to the other nations in
16:17
the pacific asia pacific area too so I
16:20
think it’s a matter really for each
16:22
nation and for groups of nations to work
16:24
on what’s common and build up the common
16:27
shared interests and work to minimize
16:30
those interest which are divergent and
16:33
that’s the task of national leadership
16:36
is the task of politicians so you know
16:39
that’s what military people they do
16:42
their jobs they learn their technologies
16:45
they are ready have called on the
16:47
they’re all patriotic they want to
16:49
defend their countries
16:50
it’s up to the political leaders to work
16:53
to smooth out the rise of nations right
16:57
everybody understands China’s growing
16:59
and it’s important we all respect china
17:02
for that and we admire the Chinese
17:04
leadership and the Chinese people for
17:06
what they’ve accomplished now over the
17:08
last 35 40 years it’s amazing
17:11
so we want to see China take its
17:13
rightful place in the harmony and
17:16
harmonious conduct of International
17:18
Affairs ok
17:19
General Clark I hope many of those
17:21
coming into the office in a few weeks
17:24
were thinking the same way as you do sir
17:27
coming back to you we only have 30
17:29
seconds left
17:30
senior captain john what if there is
17:33
going to be arms race in the region
17:36
well China and how will try to respond
17:39
to that well in China us work together
17:43
I don’t think there will be arms please
17:45
in this region and the tennis
17:48
normal development of the military will
17:50
not cause answer ease about we can see
17:53
that Japan is developing is offensive
17:56
military capabilities in this region
17:58
this is a much concern to many countries
18:01
in this region

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